An engine for the imagination’: the rise of ai image generators

"A I-generatedAI-generated artwork is quietly beginning to reshape culture. Over the last few years, the ability of machine learning systems to generate imagery from text prompts has increased dramatically in quality, accuracy, and expression. Now, these tools are moving out of research labs and into the hands of everyday users, where they’re creating new visual languages of expression and — most likely — new types of trouble.

There are only thought to be a few dozen top-flight image-generating AI in existence right now. They’re tricky and expensive to create, requiring access to millions of images used to train the system (it looks for patterns in the pictures and copies them) and a great deal of computational grunt (for which costs vary, but a million-dollar price tag isn’t out of the question).

Right now, the output of these systems is mostly treated as novelty when it gets splashed on a magazine cover or used to generate memes. But as we speak, artists and designers are integrating this software into their workflow, and in a short amount of time, AI-generated and AI-augmented art will be everywhere. Questions about copyright (who owns the image? Who made it?) and about potential dangers (like biased output or AI-generated misinformation) will have to be dealt with quickly…

rest here:

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I’m seeing these types of creations pop up all over Deviant Art…

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I guess it will take a while for artists to decide how big of a role these image generators should play in their work.

I laughed at what I assume was a spelling mistake but may be a prediction:

Inside the community, you have a million people making images, and they’re all riffing off each other, and by default, everybody can see everybody else’s images. You have to pay extra to pull out the community — and usually, if you do that, it means you’re some type of commercial user. So everyone’s ripping off each other, and there’s all these new aesthetics.

Then there’s this:

So I moved to San Francisco and started a technology company called Leap Motion around 2011. And we sold [these hardware devices that would do motion capture on your hands](https://www.theverge.com/2012/6/26/3118592/leap-motion-gesture-controls), kind of inventing a lot of the gestural interface space.

I remember Leap Motion.

For some reason, the lyrics to a version of the song “Collective Consciousness” come to mind when thinking about AI images.

“The fires will burn in their defeat!
The human heart is obsolete!
Breaking down the fabric of society!
Collective Consciousness controlled as you will see!”