I don't know why but I like using Krita more than CSP for comics

A lot of people use CSP for comics. I used CSP for 2 comics before I found out Krita has a comics manager. When I tried to draw a comic on Krita I loved it and I’ve been making my comics on Krita since then.

The thing is, again, a looooot of people use CSP for their comics. I don’t know why I prefer Krita to CSP lol.
Any ideas?

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Maybe if you go back to using CSP for your next comic, you can make notes about anything that gives you problems or confusion or seems to be ‘not as good’?
Then you could go to a CSP forum and tell them what needs to be improved to make it ‘more like krita’. :laughing:

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That’s actually a good idea! Thanks

Hm… I think the ‘create page from template’ feature, the default brushes, and the comic manager docker is what makes me like Krita more.

CSP has more powerful tools for creating panels, but it’s prolly not my cup of tea. I prefer making a vector layer and draw rectangles, and make a ‘mask layer’ underneath the panels. I find it simpler and easier to do that.

So yeah, these are the reasons why I prefer Krita for comics!

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Good to know, we had been wondering if we should offer a sort of group layer that wraps all the panel related stuff so it doesn’t clutter the layers docker, but I guess we should also make sure that whatever features we add also allow for alternative workflows like these.

I imagine that with CSP, the whole ‘you have to have this many pages’ is a bit intimidating compared to ‘just add another page’? I know that this is in CSP because it’s really designed for a print-workflow, and print has some hard rules on how many pages a single story should have. I think for Krita, I’d rather let the author select whether they’re working for print (and maybe even, select the size of a gathering) and then just give some nice UI indicators for how many pages they need to add to fill the minimum amount of printed pages. I really designed the comic manager to make it easy to start thumbnailing any given idea, so forcing people to think about the print result kinda goes against that philosophy.

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