Traditional Art-

I’m going to be trying traditional art for a little while, and I would like some suggestions on:
watercolors, brushes for said watercolors, papers that are watercolor and fountain pen safe, sketchbooks, pencils, and pretty much anything related to the listed items.

I will be using Krita to enhance my drawings. (I’m actually preparing for a new computer, yay!)

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For solid advice on materials and techniques you might check out this YouTube channel:

https://www.youtube.com/c/mindofwatercolor

Generally, use the best materials you can afford–especially paper. You can get away with cheap brushes and student grade watercolor paint, but paper is the key. My favorite brands are Arches and Fabriano Artistico. There are other excellent papers, too.

Sketchbooks are hit and miss for fountain pens and watercolors. I use Hand Book sketchbooks and they are adequate. There are also several brands of watercolor sketchbooks and you might try whatever is available. My favorite sketchbooks for ink and watercolor are Stillman & Birn Zeta Series.

For paint I like Daniel Smith or M. Graham. Winsor and Newton, Holbein, and Rembrandt are other very good paints. I haven’t used Schminke. I look for single pigment paints that have the best lightfastness ratings. You don’t need many colors to get started.

Good luck on your new ventures!

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Not sure if you intend to produce finished art with pencils, but if you have any questions in that regard I’d be glad to provide input. I’ve been doing traditional pencil art (mostly portraits) for decades. :slight_smile:

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I think prices for brands can vary a lot based on location, so for example here in the UK Winsor & Newton tend to be more affordable than Daniel Smith in my experience.

Buying sets can be cost effective if you need the colours they offer, especially if you look out for sales. Some fancier sets can be very expensive though. Good quality watercolours cost a lot as they have high pigment loads and are more likely to use single pigments, but a little can go a long way.

Pans are good for convenience, but tubes can be better value and offer more flexibility. You can also squeeze them into empty pans and let them dry.

Some pigments are more transparent than others. That’s generally desirable for watercolour because vibrancy is usually achieved by bouncing light off the white of the paper.

Personally, with a limited budget I would spend my money on a few good quality tubes with a spectral range than offers the best mixing opportunities. This secondary palette is a good example: handprint : secondary palette

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Thank you, @Mythmaker and @kingbird.
@kacart Please do, I’d like some help. :pencil2:

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I will agree with @kingbird wrt Arches and Fabriano Artistico which I’ve used for pencil drawings … Arches primarily … good quality paper is essential…

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now I NEED to see

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Ha! :slight_smile: You can see a selection of my work (both digital and pencil) at my Deviantart site:

https://www.deviantart.com/kennyc/gallery

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Impressive! I don’t think i could manage it, as I love the feeling of adding colors to my drawings, and without that feeling I may not even want to draw at all!

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I’m also with kingbird and kacart on the papers - hot-pressed cotton papers are very good for detailed work. I’ve used Arches, Fabriano, Saunders Waterford, and Winsor and Newton hot-press and they were all good. You might want something a bit cheaper for general sketching though.

You can buy large sheets and cut them down, or pre-made blocks. Lower-weight papers tend to buckle when wet, so you would pre-wet and tape them to stretch the paper out. Buying a gummed block is more convenient - I do like the Winsor and Newton block I’ve got.

One thing to note is art stores often sell their own branded goods, and they’re often made for them by highly-regarded brands. You can get some nice bargains this way if you do your research.

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